Advice on Tough Interview Questions

by Melanie Korn

Posted on January 24, 2020 at 11:15:19 AM




Getting to truly know a candidate during an interview can be a daunting process.   Hiring as a whole can set a business back or move it forward just by making the best hires. People are your most valuable asset, and working to find, hire and retain the best people to meet your needs takes true commitment. Interviews are more than a get to know you process, they are a process to better understand work ethic, skills and how specific candidates may or may not fit in a company’s culture.

We’ve all had that one interview that has thrown us off our game.  So how do you deal with some of the tough questions that can come up?  Here are a few typical questions that come to mind and some tips on how to structure your answers in an interview. 

 

Tell me about yourself: Remember this is not an invitation to hone your stand up skills or detail your hobbies and family tree.  Structure a direct answer that explains who you are professionally, a brief statement of your skills and a key statement relevant to the type of work you are looking for. 

 

Why should I hire you?: This question is your opportunity to sell your skills.   Detail how you can contribute to the company based on your previous performance. 

 

What is your major weakness?: No one wants to point out their flaws in an interview but this question gets ask frequently.  Be prepared with an example of what you honestly feel the weakness is the steps you have taken to address it and the results or improvements you have demonstrated.

 

Do you have any questions for me?:  It is tempting to answer yes or no to this question but take a second to refer back to the notes you have taken during your interview and the questions you have prepared in advance.  Even if your questions have all been answered give examples of your understanding of some of the key points the interviewer has made as your reason for not having any further questions.   Remember this is also your opportunity to turn the question around and ask “do you have any other questions for me or concerns about why I wouldn’t be a good fit for this position?”  Providing clarification on these points is a great way to close an interview.


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